Friday, March 30, 2007

Congratulations, Pesky Fly!

I was quite pleased when I went to the Memphis Flyer website and saw that Chris Davis won Green Eyeshade (Who came up with that name?* See update below) award from the Society of Professional Journalists for his two excellent pieces on the Katrina-ravaged Gulf Coast found here and here.
It's well deserved, my friend.

Another local winner was Memphis Magazine editor Marilyn Saler for a magnificent article about life in the 38126 ZIP code, one of the poorest in the country.

UPDATE: Trent, a previous Green Eyeshade winner, was kind enough to fill me in on the derivation of the award's name.

The "Green Eyeshade" term comes from the headgear that editors used to wear in the early part of the century during the glory "Front Page" days of the newspaper. Worn like a baseball cap, with the visor a sort of see-through opaque green, it made harsh light easy on the eyes for editors poring through reams of news copy.

I'm not sure when the Society for Professional Journalists started giving out the awards, but it stems from that.Hunter Thompson was known to wear one during his early adventures in journalism, for what it's worth.

-- Trent, a previous Green Eyeshade winner.

3 comments:

Trent said...

The "Green Eyeshade" term comes from the headgear that editors used to wear in the early part of the century during the glory "Front Page" days of the newspaper. Worn like a baseball cap, with the visor a sort of see-through opaque green, it made harsh light easy on the eyes for editors poring through reams of news copy.

I'm not sure when the Society for Professional Journalists started giving out the awards, but it stems from that.

Hunter Thompson was known to wear one during his early adventures in journalism, for what it's worth.

-- Trent, a previous Green Eyeshade winner.

PeskyFly said...

Thanks Freed. Just doing what I do, as well as I can do it.

Freedonian said...

Thank you, Trent.

Chris, you're too humble. I'm proud to know the fella that wrote those two pieces. I emailed them around when they first ran, and I'm proud to know the fellow who wrote them.